Cosmic Daddy Issues

Are you ready to reclaim your spiritual power after leaving the church? Join us for a 6 week course and support group for queer and trans folx healing after Christianity, ages 18+. Sessions are 90 minutes, weekly, and are led by Pippa (she/they), a queer and transfeminine spiritual teacher and guide. As a former priest, Pip brings over a decade of experience in religious leadership, and as a witchy woman, she brings a deep connection to the cycles of nature and personal power.

The cost is $120 for 6 weeks ($20 per session), with 3 sliding scale spots available. This group is limited to a maximum of 8-10 participants. You may be added to a waitlist for a winter or springtime cohort. Ask about reserved spaces for BIPOC.

This will be a closed group, meaning once the group is put together, no new folx will be added. This helps to create a safe(r) environment in which trust and rapport are built so that you are able to feel respected and valued in your journey. If you are interested and would like more information about the group process or expectations, please reach out!

** DISCLAIMER: Heresy advisory in effect! We will be deconstructing oppressive theologies, exposing their roots in patriarchal power structures. We will be savouring the taste of forbidden fruit, and boldly exploring the world of spiritual taboo.

Dates: October 19, 2021 – November 23, 2021

Time: Tuesdays from 7-8:30pm (EST)

Location: Virtually, on Zoom

Cost: $120 (for 6 sessions)

Weekday Morning Meditations

Looking to connect with a regular meditation practice? Join us for free, gently guided, early morning meditations every weekday from 7:30-7:50am (EST) on Zoom.

🔹 Specially designed with queer and trans people in mind
🔹 Suitable for beginners and advanced practitioners alike
🔹 Each weekday offers a different form/style of meditation to help us get grounded in the present moment

* Only the facilitator’s microphone is on – all other participants are muted. Feel free to have your camera open or closed depending on whatever feels most comfortable for you.

What to expect?

Mondays– 20 minutes of guided affirmations with optional self-administered bilateral tapping techniques (demonstrated and guided)

* examples of affirmations we might use: “even though I feel overwhelmed by emotions sometimes, I am learning to let my feelings flow through”
* not all statements will resonate with every person, so take what works and leave what doesn’t
Tuesdays– 5 minutes introduction and guidance into the practice of stillness and silence
– 10 minutes of total silence, together
– 5 minutes of guided centring and grounding to close

* capacity for stillness and silence varies widely based on physical (dis)ability, neurodiversity, mental health, and other factors. You are the expert on your own bandwidth and tolerance for either physical stillness or mental quiet.
Wednesdays– 20 minutes of a guided body scan (moving our awareness from the feet, to the head, and back down to the feet again)

* this embodiment exercise focuses on feeling/sensing the physical body and is designed to be as accessible as possible to individuals with dysphoria, dysmorphia, and/or disabilities (visible or invisible). That being said, embodiment practices always have the potential to be activating or triggering, and will not be right for everyone. You are the expert when it comes to your own body, so listen to your physical needs and boundaries, and set your own pace
Thursdays– 20 minutes of guided visualization – designed to (re)align your core values, emotions, thoughts, and hopes/dreams using imagination and visualization techniques

* not everyone has a visual-spacial imagination, and that’s ok! Some people find visualizations tedious, silly or even uncomfortable, so take what works and leave what doesn’t.
Fridays– 20 minutes of guided preparation for death
– first we take about 5 minutes to connect with the signs of aliveness in our bodies, and to remind ourselves of our connection to all living things
– then we flow into about 10 minutes of guidance through some preparations for death, continually returning to the phrase: “Everything alive will die; I am alive and I will die”
– finally we finish off with about 5 minutes of (re)connecting to our sense of aliveness and how that can connect us to what really matters to us


* contemplating mortality is a difficult but ancient spiritual practice that can feel uncomfortable or even overwhelming for some people. We use this form of meditation to ground us in the reality of the natural cycles of life and death.
* side note: apart from morning meditation, we highly recommend that people think through and write down your desires for end-of-life care (regardless of age, health, or other factors). This could include: writing/updating your “Final Will and Testament”, registering as an organ donor , outlining what kind of funeral or service of remembrance you might want, or just generally talking with your loved ones about natural process of death and dying. If you’re looking for more resources, please reach out.

** an anti-racist, anti-oppressive, body positive, trauma-informed, anti-appropriative space

What is an anti-racist space?

All morning meditation sessions that we host are carefully curated and heavily moderated. We acknowledge and resist all forms of racism, white supremacy and colonialism, especially when disguised in language and practice of religious belief or spirituality. See “our commitment to you” below, for the specifics on how we aim to create safer spaces with BIPOC in mind.

If you have suggestions to improve or clarify our anti-racist policy, please reach out.

What is a body positive space?

All bodies are amazing, powerful, and inherently worthy of love. We affirm and celebrate the diversity of human form, size, and shape whenever we engage with our physical bodies in the context of spiritual practice, meditation, or movement. We also take into account the wide range of physical (dis)ability, both visible and invisible, and strive to make our morning meditations as accessible as possible.

If you have any suggestions for increased accessibility, please reach out.

What is a trauma-informed space?

We come from an understanding that trauma affects our whole person (body, mind, and emotions), and that whenever people gather together there is potential for trauma responses to be activated or triggered. Sometimes trauma affects us at the individual level, other trauma is generationally inherited, and some forms of trauma are experienced across entire populations or groups of people.

All trauma responses are natural and valid, and we hold a space that acknowledges that sometimes our nervous systems just can’t handle any more. If for any reason you feel activated or triggered during a morning meditation, we encourage you to do whatever you need in order to take care of yourself.

Check out our resources page for more about what trauma is, how to build resilience practices, ideas on what to do when activated or triggered, or to find therapists who are qualified to help.

What about cultural and spiritual appropriation?

As white, European settlers in Canada, we acknowledge the problematic and harmful trend in many spiritual communities towards cultural and spiritual appropriation. That’s why we’re doing our best to stay in our lane. Whenever we come together, we only share from our own lived experience of spirituality — honouring keepers of wisdom and tradition in their original context. The forms and practices used in morning meditations draw from Pip’s personal practice, which has been informed by (1) universalist, post-christian mysticism, (2) animistic paganism drawing from her own eclectic witchcraft, (3) “western esotericism” via ceremonial magick and (4) contemporary scientific research on techniques to calm the mind and ground the body (like Generative Somatics).

We think this is an important issue, which is why we encourage people to read through this guide and list of resources from the team at Native Governance Centre, Cultural Appropriation and the Wellness Space.

Our commitment to you

As organizers and facilitators we commit to:
(a) stay in our lane by not using iconography, music, clothing, sacred medicines, regalia, or embodiment practices from outside our lived experience, and by ensuring proper compensation for any special guests from outside our religious or spiritual context,
(b) regularly remind the room (in verbal and written form) about cultural and spiritual appropriation, and call individuals in for a private conversation or call out publicly depending on the nature of the situation,
(c) interrupt racism, classism, fat-phobia, misogyny, ableism, transphobia, homophobia, and all other forms of discrimination immediately, and call individuals in for a private conversation or call out publicly depending on the nature of the situation,
(d) be open to being called in or called out if a member of the group feels that we have failed to maintain group safety as facilitators, and we will work to repair the situation,
(e) create and encourage opportunities for honest feedback and constructive criticism to continue to improve on our ability to offer safer spaces for spiritual work in community.

* Morning meditations are an independent spiritual offering and are not affiliated with any religious institution or organization. We have no expectations on your beliefs, morals, philosophy, spiritual practices, or religious/cultural identity – and we do not tolerate proselytizing or evangelizing of any kind.

* In the spirit of inclusion and accessibility, there is no cost to attend morning meditations. If you would like to make a contribution to support this work, please reach out.

New Moon Gatherings

WHat to Expect

Virtually join us as we mark the completion of each lunar cycle, together. New Moons are a great time for personal reflection and to set intentions for the coming month. As queer and trans folks, we bring our collective energy together to bring about powerful manifestation in our lives and world. Each month we tap into the living flow of energy that has sustained our queer forebears and transcestors throughout time and space — dismantling oppression, co-creating a more equitable world, and healing in community. We aim to create an informal and relaxed environment to (re)connect with yourself and others, following the flow of the seasons and rhythms of nature.

Gatherings begin at 7pm on the night of each new moon, and last for approximately 50 minutes.

Supplies to have ready:

  • a pen/pencil and notebook (or device for writing notes or drawing)
  • a mug or cup of tea, water, or other drink
  • a candle (optional)

Contact us for more information or free registration.

* an anti-racist, anti-oppressive, body positive, trauma-informed space

What is an anti-racist space?

All gatherings that we host are carefully curated and heavily moderated. We resist all forms of racism, white supremacy and colonialism, especially when disguised in language and practice of religious beliefs or spiritual identity. See “our commitment to you” below, for the specifics on how we aim to create safer spaces.

If you have suggestions to improve or clarify our anti-racist policy, please reach out.

What is a body positive space?

All bodies are amazing, powerful, and inherently worthy of love. We affirm and celebrate the diversity of human form, size, and shape whenever we engage with our physical bodies in the context of spiritual practice, meditation, or movement. We also take into account the wide range of physical dis/ability, both visible and invisible, and strive to make our gatherings as accessible as possible.

If you have any suggestions for increased accessibility, please reach out.
** Closed captions are available for all gatherings.

What is a trauma-informed space?

We come from an understanding that trauma affects our whole person (body, mind, and emotions), and that whenever people gather together there is potential for trauma responses to be activated or triggered. Sometimes trauma affects us at the individual level, other trauma is generationally inherited, and some forms of trauma are experienced across entire populations or groups of people.

All trauma responses are natural and valid, and we hold a space that acknowledges that sometimes our nervous systems just can’t handle any more. If for any reason you feel activated or triggered during a gathering with us, we encourage you to do whatever you need in order to be safe. We remind all groups at the beginning of every session (both verbally and in written form) of our commitment to maintaining a trauma aware space.

Check out our resources page for more about what trauma is, how to build resilience practices, ideas on what to do when activated or triggered, or to find therapists who are qualified to help.

What about cultural and spiritual appropriation?

As un-invited, white, European settlers on this land, Xris and Pip acknowledge the problematic and harmful trend in many spiritual communities towards cultural and spiritual appropriation. That’s why we’re doing our best to stay in our lane. Whenever we come together, we only share from our own lived experience of spirituality — honouring keepers of wisdom and tradition in their original context. The forms and practices used in gatherings draw from our personal practice, which has been informed by (1) universalist, post-christendom mysticism, (2) eclectic, animistic paganism drawing from Pip’s Witchcraft and Xris’s dutch ancestral heritage, and (3) contemporary scientific research on techniques to calm the mind and ground the body (like Generative Somatics).

We think this is an important issue, which is why we encourage people to read through this guide and list of resources from the team at Native Governance Centre: Cultural Appropriation and the Wellness Space.

Our commitment to you

As organizers and facilitators we commit to:
(a) stay in our lane by not using iconography, music, clothing, sacred medicines, regalia, or embodiment practices from outside our lived experience, and by ensuring proper compensation for any special guests from outside our religious or spiritual context,
(b) regularly remind gatherings (in verbal and written form) about the real impact of cultural and spiritual appropriation,
(c) interrupt racism, classism, fat-phobia, misogyny, ableism, transphobia, homophobia, and all other forms of discrimination immediately,
(d) be open to being called in or called out if a member of the group feels that we have failed to maintain group safety as facilitators, and we will work to repair the situation,
(e) create and encourage opportunities for honest feedback and constructive criticism to continue to improve on our ability to offer safer spaces for spiritual work in community.

Who is this for?

In the interest of maintaining group safety and comfort, gatherings are not open to the general public. This is a space especially designed for the experiences of queer and trans people.

This includes, but is not limited to: queer, lesbian, gay, bisexual, asexual, pansexual, demisexual poly/omnisexual, 2-Spirit, transgender, intersex, nonbinary, mtf, ftm, genderfluid, agender, gender neutral, and questioning people (and their partners, polycules, or chosen families).

* New Moon Gatherings are an independent spiritual offering and are not affiliated with any religious institution or organization. We have no expectations on your beliefs, morals, philosophy, spiritual practices, or religious/cultural identity – and we do not tolerate proselytizing or evangelizing of any kind.

* In the spirit of inclusion and accessibility, there is no cost to attend New Moon Gatherings. If you would like to make a contribution to support this work, please reach out.

Intention Setting for the New Year!

We’ve made it to the end of 2020! We’re proud of you for surviving a tough year, and we want to invite you to set some intentions with us to thrive in 2021.

Do you know how setting intentions is different from making resolutions or goals? For starters, intentions are rooted in our yearnings (also known as your “heart’s desires”), and when we tune in to our needs, wants, and longings they can guide us on our journey to becoming our authentic self. Be gentle with yourself as you review the past, and take some time to explore the possibilities for your future… but most importantly, be fully present to the moment, here and now. In this video, we each share two personal intentions for 2021. Xris is leaning into self-compassion, and giving their critical voice some time off, this year — this is an intention to let go of the patterns that no longer serve them. Pip is setting an intention to explore the wide world of gender expression, and to make more space for femininity as they continue transitioning socially and hormonally. We invite you to follow along with us in 2021 as we grow, change and evolve into whoever we’re becoming! It’s all process.

Queer Xmas: LiveStream!

Join us on Christmas Morning, December 25 at 11:00am (EST) for a festive gathering around the tree! Share in our little Yuletide family ritual as we celebrate the season with poetry, music, interactive conversation, and the coziness that comes from connecting together.

Optional preparations:

  • Steep a tea, or a mug of nog
  • Wear comfy pajamas, sweatpants, or a onesie
  • Grab a candle and lighter (or matches)
  • Log onto YouTube at 11am, Dec. 25

Happy Holidays, from our family to you! 🌈🎄✨

5 Tips for Surviving the Holidays (Queer Xmas Selfcare)

The holiday season can be especially hard for 2SLGBTIQSA+ folks, so we have put together 5 quick tips for surviving the holiday season. This has been a weird year, and it will likely feel like a strange holiday season.

The Yuletide might not feel as jolly and gay as we had wished for. Many of us are heading into the holidays with already heightened emotions as a result of living through a pandemic… and these feelings are amplified on top of anxiety that might come up when us queer and trans folks think about reconnecting with families of origin at this time of year. We want to encourage you to make a holiday safety plan. Spend a bit of time before any gatherings, or Zoom calls, to decide how you want to navigate the pieces of this season that will be the most difficult for you. Whether you’re struggling with family who don’t accept your identity, or spending the holidays alone, or even if you’re surrounded by supportive family, these five tips will help you prepare a self-care plan that works for you.

We want you to head into this season with a couple of extra tools in your toolbox, and a light at the end of the tunnel. Let’s all be gentle with ourselves over the holidays, and drink lots of water! If you find yourself home on Christmas morning, and you want to celebrate with our little, queer family then join us:

December 25 @ 11:00am (EST) for QUEER XMAS LiveStream!
Happy Holidays! 🎄🎁

Resources for Parents of LGBTQ+ Kids and Youth

Your kid just came out, now what do you do? It’s normal to be filled with emotions when your child, grandchild, or young person in your life comes out to you. You might feel shocked, confused, angry, excited, overwhelmed, unprepared, afraid for their safety, etc… any or all of those feelings are valid and natural. It’s going to be ok. You’ve come to the right place.

This is a brief introduction to a series of resources coming in the new year for parents and guardians of kids/youth who are exploring sexuality and gender identity. When someone we love comes out to us, it’s also an invitation for us to “come in” to a deeper relationship with them. It takes a great deal of courage to be honest and authentic with authority figures, and we’re proud of you for being the kind of adult that landed here. We encourage you to commit yourself, starting now, to walking this path in love. No matter how you initially reacted, and regardless of what thoughts or feelings may arise along the journey, you can choose a posture of openness, listening, and compassion. We believe in you, and we’re here to support you.

If you’d like to book a session with Xris or Pip for guidance or support, reach out to xrisandpip@gmail.com, or find us on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/xrisandpip

Additional Resources

Surprise Hygiene

Surprise is a unique emotion, and although many people relate it to happiness or fear, it is in a special category of its own. Surprise is the WOW emotion, and it is most directly associated with what we call spirituality.

There’s so much variety to the surprise category of emotions, from amazement, wonder, or awe, to excitement or shock, and it also includes the feeling of entertainment. Unfortunately, it’s easier now than ever to be emotionally numbed in a state of staying mildly entertained, which can undermine our capacity to feel the expansiveness of true wonder and amazement. Maybe now is a good time to turn off YouTube for today and try some surprise hygiene practices?

Surprise Hygiene Ideas:

  • Slow down. Stop and smell flowers.
  • Go somewhere to stargaze
  • Sit by the ocean and watch the waves
  • Take intentional breaks from scrolling

Fear Hygiene

Fear can feel like one of the most uncomfortable emotions, but it is also one of our most basic instincts, and our fiercest protector. Getting in touch with our feelings of fear can seem overwhelming, but we often find freedom when we befriend our fear.

Remember that when we are feeling anxiety, it is a physical response to a perceived threat (either from the past, or about the future). It’s important to remind ourselves that we are here today because our bodies know how to get us through fear, and we can trust our instincts to protect us in the case of present danger. Fearful emotions range from uncertainty and nervousness, to anxiety, dread, and terror. The physical sensations of feeling afraid can include: shaking or trembling, sweating, clammy hands, shortness of breath, a strong desire to run away, increased heart rate, and even hyperventilation. When you feel any of these physical sensations it can serve as an indication that it’s time to practice some fear hygiene.

Fear Hygiene Ideas:

  • Observe your surroundings using your 5 senses
  • Take some deep breaths
  • Move your body – shake it out!
  • Be curious. Is this anxiety about the past, or the future?
  • Ground yourself in the present moment

Disgust Hygiene

Disgust emotions (shame, envy, jealousy, etc.) feel icky and uncomfortable, which is why we need extra practice letting it run through our bodies. Shame hygiene is hard, but we’re here to give some tips about how to get all that stuck energy moving.

In highly social creatures, like humans, the disgust category of emotions is much more nuanced, including tricky feelings like shame, judgement, guilt, jealousy, and envy. When these emotions arise, many people push down the associated physical sensations because they can feel so unpleasant. The experience of disgust can feel like nausea, indigestion, movement up the esophagus, an impulse to hide, lowering the eyes or face to look at the ground, a need to crumple into the fetal position, or even vomiting. As awful as it can seem, all of these responses are natural and healthy. And with a regular practice of disgust hygiene we can keep those feelings from compounding in our bodies.

Disgust Hygiene Ideas:

  • Reach out to a trusted friend
  • Compassionate eye contact with yourself in a mirror
  • Deep exhale with a “ha-” sound
  • Make a face with your tongue out
  • Arch your back and cough